The Foodie Bugle Shop in Bath

by Silvana de Soissons12th November 2014

We are opening a grocery-provisions-homewares shop at 7 Margaret’s Buildings, Bath BA1 2LP at the beginning of December 2014.

 

We are between the Royal Crescent and The Circus, just off of Brock Street. 

 

It will stock all our online shop food and drink larder supplies, traiteur delicatessen range and homewares, kitchenalia, gardening tools, cookbooks, flowers and plants. You can also sit and enjoy tasters of the food and drink in our little tearoom.

 

We will be organising events such as cookbook signings, artisan lectures, social media courses, food-wine-ale pairings etc. If you would like to stay updated with all our news and events, please sign up to our Newsletter here.

 

A short history of Margaret's Buildings, Bath

 

Margaret’s Buildings is a pedestrianised street, built around 1769, by John Wood the Younger, leading off of Brock Street, between the Royal Crescent and The Circus.

John Wood, the Younger (25 February 1728 – 18 June 1782) was an English architect, working principally in the city of Bath. He was the son of the architect John Wood The Elder and as a young man worked on several of his father’s projects such as Liverpool Town Hall.  His designs were highly influential during the 18th century and the Royal Crescent {which he commenced building in 1767, aged 39} is considered to be one of the best examples of Georgian Neo-Classical architecture in Britain. 

Around 1752 or early 1753 he married Elizabeth Brock. They had two sons together and seven daughters. It is thought he lived at 41 Gay Street, in a house built by his father in 1734-36 for a rich Quaker.  

Wood died at his home, Eagle House, in Batheaston, on 16 June 1781 and was buried beside his father in the chancel at St Mary’s Church in Swainswick. He was deeply in debt, partly due to financial conditions relating to his father’s earlier building projects.

Margaret’s Buildings was named after Mrs Margaret Garrard (nee) Gay from whose family the Woods obtained nearly all their building leases in Bath. Margaret Gay was the daughter of an eminent surgeon and Bath M.P. Robert Gay. In 1737 she inherited the estate of Walcot Manor, on whose land most of Bath is now built, previously owned by her father since 1699. She married lawyer Thomas Garrard in 1738-39, and the Garrard family were Lords of the Manor of Lamer Wheathamptonstead in Hertfordshire. She died a childless widow in 1765, bequething the entire Walcot estate to her brother-in-law Sir Benet Garrard. 

The small Margaret Chapel was gutted in the 1942 air raids. The street is now home to a number of interesting galleries, boutiques, a restaurant, a cafe and independent, family owned businesses. 

About the Author

Silvana de Soissons is the founder of The Foodie Bugle Shop and its journal. You can follow her on Twitter @SilvanadeS and @TheFoodieBugle and on Facebook and Instagram @TheFoodieBugle

 
 
Margaret's Buildings - between the Royal Crescent and The Circus

Margaret's Buildings - between the Royal Crescent and The Circus

John Wood The Elder {right} with Sir Robert Gay {left}, the father of Margaret Garrard, after whom Margaret's Buildings was named.

John Wood The Elder {right} with Sir Robert Gay {left}, the father of Margaret Garrard, after whom Margaret's Buildings was named.

John Wood's seal and signature

John Wood's seal and signature